Paste your Google Webmaster Tools verification code here
nav-left cat-right
cat-right

Preschool Line and Shape Tracing Practise: Free Worksheet...

To help a child progress to letter formation, allowing the child opportunities to strengthen hand muscles and improve fine motor neurone skills are important. These can be achieved through playing with play dough, cutting, drawing and colouring in. However, I have made some worksheets to help improve pencil control. This one also reviews shape recognition: reviewing the square and circle. You could also use them for cutting practise. line shape tracing practise Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Preschool Shape Outlines Tracing Free Worksheet

This is a sheet to help with pen control as well as shape recognition. Let the child trace around the shapes to help improve pen control, as well as enforce shape recognition. shape outlines Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Why are Jigsaw Puzzles Important for Preschoolers

I always remember reading “Puzzles, Puzzles, Puzzles,” in an articles about teaching preschoolers. We have all heard that jigsaws are good educational toys for young children, but why? Jigsaw puzzles are great for reading readiness. Children who are good at puzzles are generally quicker at reading. This is because of the brain skills developed by doing puzzles. These skills involve spatial recognition, spatial co-ordination, and matching. When a child learns to read he must firstly decipher the letters, letters are no more than complex shapes. A jigsaw is a selection of complex shapes, which the child has to work with to build a picture. The child is also looking for the relationships between the different pieces to work out which bit goes where. Therefore by doing a puzzle the child is giving his brain a workout, developing those skills he will employ later when he starts to read. so if you’re stuck for ideas for your preschooler: Puzzles, Puzzles, Puzzles… Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

5 Ideas to do with Preschoolers

When homeschooling multiple ages it is easy to forget about the preschooler- after all those older kids have real work to do like long division, learning the planets of the solar system, mastering past perfect tenses, etc etc… However, there is a wealth of studies highlighting the importance of preschool education. But regardless of the educational and developmental benefits of investing in preschool/nursery activities, ensuring your little learners are catered for will make the homeschool day go more smoothly. So here are 5 simple ideas you can do- one each day! 1. Playdough It’s simple, but young kids love it. The tactile nature of playdough has been shown to help relax young children, and the use of tools helps strengthen muscles in the hand for writing later. It also develops fine motor neurone skills. Receipe: 2 cups flour 1 cup salt 1 tablespoon cooking oil ½- 1 cup water Mix the flour and salt, then add the water and oil. Only add a little water at a time, so the mixture isn’t too wet. Knead the dough until smooth. Add food colourings of your choice. 2. Painting Painting is very versatile. We use poster paint, it is think and easy to apply for young children. You can paint with a brush, you can use sponges to print, it can be watered down and blown with straws. 3. Cutting Again young children love to cut up pieces of paper. You can give them lines to cut along, old magazines to cut out. This also strengthen the muscles of the hand, and improves fine motor neurone skills… all essential for preparation for writing. 4. Gluing Creating from bits of junk fires the imagination. We have a large box with bits and bobs that can be used for gluing. We keep toilet roll tubes, old cardboard boxes, chocolate wrappers. I also have a small box with shiny paper, foil, scraps of material etc basically little interesting things. These I use for small gluing activities, like gluing on a paper plate- better if you want less mess to clear up! 5. Baking Baking brings in a lot of skills: for example listening to instructions, measuring… It is also tactile and again strengthens little hands. Baking activities that involve the child rubbing the ingredients, rolling, kneading, mixing are perfect for a little baker… and you get to eat the end product! Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Awesome Autumn: Tree Painting Craft

Finally I have found a use for baby cotton buds. Cotton buds are one of these baby products you seem to have in abundance but never seem to use. I found a picture of this craft on Pinerest and shamelessly stole it! I drew round a cup, to make a circle for the little boys, and painted a trunk for them- older children can do this themselves. Then each child was given a cotton bud, and I squirted different autumn shades of poster paint onto an old egg box lid. They then dipped the bud in the paint and filled the circle with different coloured dots, they also lined the bottom of the page with some, for leaves that had already fallen. This made a simple, but effective craft suitable for pre-school through primary ages. Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...
%d bloggers like this: