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Homeschooling Whilst Pregnant

Every pregnancy is different and has it’s ups and downs. Homeschooling whilst being pregnant came be a very difficult time. For most women the two “hard” points in pregnancy are the beginning and the end. These are the days where you feel you will never get through. This is now my second pregnancy whilst homeschooling, and it does add extra strain to your day. But one thing I’ve learnt for motherhood in general is that times and seasons change, and we have to learn to work with the season we are in. Rest is vitally important when pregnant. Not resting enough will result in a deterioration you your mental health, and will make you a less pleasant person to live with! Listen to your body’s need to rest, and try to factor in a nap in the afternoon, if you have a little one, snuggle up together after lunch and have a sleep. I allow the older children to have some TV time, to keep the house quiet. Pacing yourself is also important, be wise as to what you say yes to, and how full the calendar becomes. It is not only important that you are helped in the house, but in general it is important to train older children to look after their living environment. I also (pregnant or not) train the children in tidying up, hoovering, laundry, etc. It is good for them, and you, that they learn to pick up after themselves. It is also OK that there are times where you focus only on the essentials- reading, english, maths. Do not feel pressurised into loading up the day with too much activity. Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

New to Homeschooling?

Starting out homeschooling is a daunting thought! It can feel overwhelming and frightening, you may have to deal with those close to you criticising your decision. Then there is the choice of curriculum- the bewildering array, and the conflicting voices all saying their’s is best can be very confusing! Whether you start out at day one of school, or start when your children are a bit older, my advice is to take it slow! Consider what are your essentials… I would suggest maths, and english (reading and writing basically!). Make this your starting point. If your children have already been in school, do not feel you have to reject the curriculum the school used. Consider sticking with the maths and english/language curriculum they were already doing. This will bring continuity for them, you can always change at a later date. Join your local homeschool support group. If you have heard of any curriculum and want to know more about it, there is a good chance someone close by will already be using it. Other homeschoolers are always happy to answer questions, also ask if anyone has had negative experiences with the curriculum. Remember, what has been amazing for one child, may not suit your child. Once your confidence grows, then add other subjects. Part of homeschooling is not only educating your child, but learning about your child in a new and different way. Finding out how they learn, what fires their imagination, their interests and likes all help inform the course of their education. Many home educators build their child’s education around their child’s natural interests. Even if the early days of schooling is reading together, it is a start. Educating a child is a very long marathon. Do not sprint ahead at the beginning and become worn out! Take your time. Do not be surprised with feelings of failure, and a sense that you are not doing the best by your child. We all battle these thoughts. They are not helped when we feel the world is watching, judging our decision to home educate. Children learn at their own pace, but they do learn, they are created for learning. It is important to find people to love and support you through this journey. Other homeschoolers will be a great source of encouragement- well they should! Find people you can connect with, and who will love you and your family. Online there are many blogs, and forums where there is advice, encouragement and support from people who want you to succeed. Finally, seek to keep yourself in a spiritually...

P is for Patience

When my daughter was born I was desperate for her to reach her developmental milestones, and ideally to do so early! When she was one I would lie in bed a count how many words she had… I had a book which gave you a guide as to how many words a child should/could have at 12 months, 15 months, 18 months, etc, etc. Perhaps it was her mop of thick hair which made her look older which added to my drive. Thankfully for my fearfully, neurotic first time mummy self, she was very quick (in fact I’m sure my guidelines for how many words a baby should have, probably put the fear of God into many a new mum!) Then came The Jedi Boy! No word counting there… I was just thankful to reach the end of my days with a degree of sanity intact! As we have progressed, I have learnt to stop judging my children’s development in such simplistic ways. I have had to learn patience! All to often a child develops at their own pace, and according to their personalities. Educating my son and daughter- two extremes on the spectrum, I can now fully understand why boys tend to fall behind girls. The Jedi Boy responds far better to a more laid back approach to learning, motivated by his own interests. Where as The Girl seems to genuinely enjoy learning for learnings sake. The Jedi Boy may take longer to conquer reading, but he has talents his sister does not naturally flourish in. And he will get there! As we homeschool our own children in their ABCs we would do well to remember P is for Patience. Relax, they will get there. Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Homeschooling with babies and toddlers

When people find out I homeschool, and have four children, and that one of those children is three, and another is not yet one the response is, “How on earth to you manage that?” I response, is “you should meet my friends who have six, seven or eight children”. There are some obvious tricks to making this work: Make use of babies nap time, I make this the time for phonics teaching, and maths- the things the older children need the most teaching time with. Plan some activities for the toddler, and rotate them through the week. Whilst the older child/children are busy on independent work do an activity with the younger children. Have a basket of toys for the baby at hand in the area you do school. Involve toddlers in household chores- like filling the washing machine. Be flexible- grab what time you have! Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...
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