Paste your Google Webmaster Tools verification code here
nav-left cat-right
cat-right

Book List for Boys

Although the list has boys in mind, my daughter would also say these are pretty good reads. When choosing books to read to my children I like to find ones which are well written- no twaddle as Charlotte Mason would put it. I also like to choose books which encourage honour and noble character. A lot of modern fiction reflects the dishonour and lack of respect so common in society today. This list has many books we have read as family read alouds as well as books the children have read themselves. A book list with boys in mind (that girls will love too) The Crown and Covenant trilogy by Douglas Bond The trilogy: Duncan’s War, Kings’s Arrow and Rebels’s Keep. These books follow the M’Kethe family through the period in Scotland’s history where Christian covenanters were persecuted mercilessly. The books are wonderfully written, with lots of adventure. The godly, devout family have to navigate commitment to Christ, and respecting authority- when that authority is wicked. Bond teaches through these books that the Christian life is not black and white, that following Christ can have a high price. I particularly enjoyed the characterisation, and the honour that the children had for their godly parents. Noah frequently would ask for “one more chapter”, and would be visibly excited by the action in the books. I would warn however, Bond is graphic in how he describes the torture and violence of these times. In the second of the books the main character has to save his “sister’s virtue” against raping pillaging highlanders. Noah did not understand what this meant, and I explained that the bad men were wanting to attacked the girl, and she couldn’t defend herself against them. The final book also has some bad language, I edited this as I read aloud. However, it is one of the best series we have read. We are just beginning a second trilogy by Bond, this time set in pre-revolutionary America. The Narnia Books by C.S. Lewis This is such an obvious choice. They really are so good. All the children love these stories. We have been reading through the series of them this year. Little House on the Prarie By Laura Inglis Wilder These stories may not at first glance be “boy” books, by the life of the Inglis’ family is not some pretty, easy happy-go-lucking one. Their life was hard. Pa is a great role model for boys. When I started to read these to the boys, at first they were not keen, thinking they were girl’s books. But very...

Encouraging Creative Writing with Reluctant Writers...

One of my children is not a keen writer. It is important to encourage writing skills, without putting a child off writing, and making it a total act of drudgery. Of course there are things he just has to knuckle down to do, but I want him to see that writing can also be “fun”! This year I have given him some writing exercises with the purpose of generating a bit of fun. They may not appear to have any “educational” value- but he is expressing his interests, in doing so he is improving his writing. When something has interested him I have asked him to write about as a “school” exercise- instead of doing his “normal” work. We have worked on stories themed in things that interest him, e.g. Star Wars. These times where he is more freely expressing himself I relax with spelling, grammar, hand writing etc, I want him to focus more on the creative process of putting his own ideas and thoughts on paper. I also came across a creative writing game at the library and have created our own tailored to a boy, who is mad on Super Heroes- such as my boy is! You have a table with four columns and six rows. The columns are labeled: “Character”, “Setting”, “Emotion”, and “Object”. You take a dice and role if four times. The first one determines the character e.g. if you role a 4 you chose the character on row 4, the second role decides the setting, and so on. This gives you a framework to create a story. CLICK ON LINK TO TAKE YOU TO THE CREATIVE WRITING GAME: story writing game I have laminated our sheet, and we can bring it out periodically. Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Disciplining or Training the Heart of the Child

I write about discipline very tentatively. When I read disciplining articles or books I always image in the author to have these perfectly obedient children! I do not- I have four very different children. The oldest two in particular could not be more different. To be honest if I only had my oldest daughter, I would probably feel highly qualified to write about disciplining children, she is obedient and good- the type of child you can take anywhere! However, The Knight Boy is far more challenging! He has been sent from on high to humble me, and kill off any notion of perfect parenting! Having the Knight Boy has challenged everything I would think about parenting. I have had to really meditate and pray over scriptures like: “Do not withhold discipline from a child; if you punish them with the rod, they will not die.” Proverbs 23:13, and “Start children off on the way they should go, and even when they are old they will not turn from it.” Proverbs 22:6. What do these scripture look like when worked out in life? With such very different children I have quickly learnt that one size fits all will not work in discipline. With one child a gentle word is enough to correct them, with others they need more serious consequences. I have also come to learn smacking is not necessarily the best option. I have nothing against smacking, I do not believe it a evil of society that needs to be banned. But I also have found it does not always work. Children are complex humans and an ABC of how to take them from being babies to good, well adjusted adults does not exist. Raising a child is more about knowing that child than a how-to-manuel. I have found my style of parenting soften as time has past. The scripture I find most challenging is, “Fathers, do not embitter your children, or they will become discouraged.” Colossians 3:21. Being firm and strict is not a problem for me- I am not afraid to discipline bad behaviour, however I am learning to train more the heart of the child. The Jedi Boy is not a naughty child, he is deeply inquisitive and determined. It is better to call him spirited. Over the years I have started to now see his behaviour, not as the problem, but as a symptom: the fruit of something. As a parent I need to find the root behind the behaviour. And then tackle the root! That does not mean if he has just been rude...

Frazzled February?

Lately our house has seem to be more wild. Little boys rampaging one minute, bored and irritable the next. This mama has felt very frazzled. Yesterday I had some solace for a tired, and weary mama soul: tea, a scone, and time with one of my favourite lady’s. She is one of the Titus 2 women in my life. In the course of conversation about life, we naturally talked about the children. And this retired school teacher told me some things that are very interesting. In schools there are more exclusions in February than any other month. We are both great believers in the power of creation in the spiritual, and emotional wellbeing of children. This didn’t surprise me at all. As I do find this almighty sense of relief when spring approaches, the weather warms, and the children pile out into the garden on a more regular basis. Little boys, in particular require a lot of outside time. Even the one year old Soldier Boy has had a taste of freedom, and spends his days frustrated that he cannot go outside to play as much as he would like. After a trip around the garden, he came to me the next day with his little shoe and declared “GO!” So today the sky was blue, the wind had died down, we took the morning off “school” and went to the local Country Park. The boys ran through the forest. The Girl had a rare chance to just talk with me uninterrupted in the morning. We may only be in the beginning of February, with children keen to be outside more, in fresh air, running and playing; but our trip to the forest allowed us to see the first of the snowdrops in bloom, and the daffodil shoots appearing- spring is on the way. Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Wild Places for Wild Boys

I do think that every family ought to have at least one wild boy… We have the Jedi Boy. These are the boys who can’t sit still, who are always wanting to conquer. I spend a lot of time thinking and trying to manage the heightened testosterone of my boy. All to often we want to put these boys down, try have dampen their energy, their fight. It feels like a balancing act, sometimes we get it right other times I feel I get it wrong. Today I took him to a wild wood, he was armed with his new sword. He ran through the trees, conquered badies. He was free, he could run and be free. Boys need the freedom to be, the freedom to run, to climb, to be who they are. Little boys who can’t sit still should not be made to remain in a small space for extended periods, or they will act up. Coping Strategies for Wildy Boys: 1.Try and facilitate them the room to run about outside at least once a day. 2.Break their lessons up into bite sized chunks. When you see you are losing their interest let them run about for a few minutes. 3.Add kinesthetic learning into their day. For example, when doing our Phonics we had little stories to help enforce the sound, we acted these out. There were also actions for each sound- Jedi Boy found these very helpful. 4.Sometimes allow them to walk about whilst teaching them. 5.Give them some one-to-one time. I find Jedi Boy more than any of the other children responds for quality time alone with one of the key adults in his life: whether that be a parent or grandparent. 6.Make sure they get enough sleep. Such boys live life at top speed. Especially when they are younger they lack the ability to pace themselves, so they tire themselves out. A tired boys is a grumpy, and naughty boy! 7.Take them to wild places, where they can climb trees, paddle in streams, and run with all their might… Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...
%d bloggers like this: