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Book List for Boys

Although the list has boys in mind, my daughter would also say these are pretty good reads. When choosing books to read to my children I like to find ones which are well written- no twaddle as Charlotte Mason would put it. I also like to choose books which encourage honour and noble character. A lot of modern fiction reflects the dishonour and lack of respect so common in society today. This list has many books we have read as family read alouds as well as books the children have read themselves. A book list with boys in mind (that girls will love too) The Crown and Covenant trilogy by Douglas Bond The trilogy: Duncan’s War, Kings’s Arrow and Rebels’s Keep. These books follow the M’Kethe family through the period in Scotland’s history where Christian covenanters were persecuted mercilessly. The books are wonderfully written, with lots of adventure. The godly, devout family have to navigate commitment to Christ, and respecting authority- when that authority is wicked. Bond teaches through these books that the Christian life is not black and white, that following Christ can have a high price. I particularly enjoyed the characterisation, and the honour that the children had for their godly parents. Noah frequently would ask for “one more chapter”, and would be visibly excited by the action in the books. I would warn however, Bond is graphic in how he describes the torture and violence of these times. In the second of the books the main character has to save his “sister’s virtue” against raping pillaging highlanders. Noah did not understand what this meant, and I explained that the bad men were wanting to attacked the girl, and she couldn’t defend herself against them. The final book also has some bad language, I edited this as I read aloud. However, it is one of the best series we have read. We are just beginning a second trilogy by Bond, this time set in pre-revolutionary America. The Narnia Books by C.S. Lewis This is such an obvious choice. They really are so good. All the children love these stories. We have been reading through the series of them this year. Little House on the Prarie By Laura Inglis Wilder These stories may not at first glance be “boy” books, by the life of the Inglis’ family is not some pretty, easy happy-go-lucking one. Their life was hard. Pa is a great role model for boys. When I started to read these to the boys, at first they were not keen, thinking they were girl’s books. But very...

Homeschool History: Resources to Study World War 1

This year is the centenary of the outbreak of World War 1. Therefore it has made sense to study the War, and in doing so honour the sacrifices of those killed. I have found a number of free resources online as well as supplementing free resources with books. The BBC Primary History website is excellent, it has original footage, animations, biographies, games, as well as straight forward information about the war. Cornerstone Education has a free educational pack to download with ideas and lesson plans I bought a couple of history books to keep, firstly “The First World War” in association with the Imperial War Museums and secondly “The First World War” an Usborne History of Britain book. They are both really good, although I would highly recommend the first one. We also bought a memorabilia pack. There are number of children’s books set in the First World War, my daughter find’s studying history through historical fiction particularly helpful. There is Private Peaceful and The War Horse both by Michael Morpurgo. There is also “War Game” by Michael Foreman, this is suitable for slightly younger children, as it is a picture book. We also stumbled upon an excellent book in the library about the Hearts Battalion, called “Soldier’s Game” by James Killgore. The book is about a young footballer from Edinburgh who went to fight in the trenches. We have also been studying the poetry of the First World War The British Legion website also has some useful free resources. The School Run has some nice ideas too, like a recipe for a Trench Cake. Activity Village has some free poppy themed printables. We also visited the National War Museum, which was excellent. There are a lot of exhibitions on in the run up to Remembrance Day, so it is worth searching what is going on in your local area. To study the Great War we have looked at maps of the battle fields, discussed the changes in technology at the time which contributed to the massacre which was the Great War, and have written biographies of key people in the War. Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...

Reading List for Confident Readers: Aged 7-9 ( with a girlie slant)...

The Girl is an avid reader. One of the best buys for her was a Kindle- the wealth of free classic Kindle books has kept her busy for hours, and saved us a fortune! Here is a list of some of the great reads she has come across: Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder Little House in the Big Wood by Laura Ingalls Wilder On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett Little Lord Fauntleroy by Frances Hodgson Burnett The Railway Children by E. Nesbit Five Children and It by E. Nesbit Black Beauty by Anna Sewell Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald The Princess and Curdie by George MacDonald Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin The Black Stallion by Walter Farley Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfield The Magic Ballerina Books by Darcey Bussell (very girlie, through them she teaches the stories of famous ballets, perfect for a girl who loves ballet!) Heidi by Johanna Spyri This is not an exhaustive list. But I hope it gives some inspiration. The Girl now says her favourite writers are E. Nesbit, Frances Hodgson Burnett, and Darcey Bussell (she likes ballet!) For more ideas for good reads go to Yesterday’s Classics Ambleside Online Share this:PrintFacebookTwitterEmailLike this:Like...
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